How to Install Skirting Boards on Brick Wall?

Skirting boards are most often nailed onto the wall, but premade decorative skirtings can be screwed either with countersunk screws or directly into the brick substrate.

How Easy is It to Install Skirting Boards in Australia?

Once you have measured the height of the wall, you need to cut some pieces of wood to size. You then attach this board to the wall with nails and screws. The next step is to cover the gap between the floor and the bottom of the skirting board with a finishing piece of timber, such as hardboard or masonite.

There are two different types of skirting boards: one which is attached directly on top of your brick wall and another which sits on top of a finished floor.

If you want to install a skirting board that attaches directly onto your brick wall without making renovations to your floor, you can use blocks underneath so that it will be level.

If you want to install the skirting board on top of an already professional finish floor then you can use masonite (which is a very thin, light piece of material usually sold in 4 by 8 feet sheets) underneath.

This will help smooth out any bumps or imperfections. You should only get masonite if your floor is finished and not bare concrete.

Installing Skirting Boards Steps

The first part of this task involves removing the baseboard that sits beneath your current skirting. To do this, simply use a pry toolbar to detach it from each wall stud.

Be patient about this step because it may take some time for nails to retract, even if you’re using the correct tool. If this happens, angle your pry bar slightly (about five degrees) so that pressure is applied evenly along its entire length, not just at one point or another where you might encounter resistance.

Once all of the old skirtings have been removed, clean up any dust or debris left by running a damp rag over the area.

The second part of this project involves installing the new skirting board. If you’re not using a pneumatic nail punch (and therefore need to install with lost head nails), be sure that you use drywall screws that are between 1-1/4″ and 2″ in length.

It’s important to place these screws no further than one inch from the ends so as to avoid splitting the wood before it is attached fully. You can accomplish this by screwing on a few pieces at a time, allowing them to set for about 30 seconds while still being held in place by your power tool, and then repeating until all have been secured.

As for their placement on the wall, you’ll want to house them every six inches apart, which is what most manufacturers recommend.

Once you’ve driven your initial screws into the base of the skirting board, go back and screw them in further so that they are driven to the wall studs.

When you reach this point, drive one screw on each side of the skirting boards at their centres so as to ensure proper support. Now it’s time for spacers- begin by pushing these onto your long screws about three inches from either end.

Spacers are really just small pieces of scrap wood that have been angled cut into 2″ lengths then driven into place with a power nail gun or hammer. Next, take your first piece of skirting and push it up against the centre spacers.

The inside edge of the skirting will line up with the outside edge of the spacer. Be sure to push it all the way against them so that they can help hold things in place as you install.

If you’re using brad nails, now is a good time to begin shooting them into place. A cordless nailer will speed up this process quite nicely and reduce the risk of injury since there’s no need for an air compressor or hose.

Feel free to slide each piece back and forth on top of their respective spacers as needed before applying enough pressure to sink each brad fully into your baseboard and wall studs.

Once this has been completed, it’s time for those finishing screws; screw these down about two inches from either end so that they are hidden beneath the final skirting board.

skirting board on a wall installation
How to Install a Skirting board on Your Wall

Should I Glue or Nail Skirting Boards?

You should always use screws to attach skirting boards to your wall plug. Make sure that there is a screw for each stud, every six inches up the wall. This will make it much easier for you to take out or repair anything that needs fixing in the future.

Also, make sure that you are using drywall screws. Longer screws will be better for this job because they will give the skirting boards more support.

Nails should never be used to attach skirting boards as they can pop out over time and cause problems. Glue cannot hold up the weight of the skirting board; it is not strong enough.

What Tools will I Need?

You will need screwdrivers, a power drill/screwdriver, and a pry bar for this job. Nails are not needed because you are attaching skirting boards with screws into the wall studs. You can find all of these tools at your local hardware store.

Can I Use Liquid Nails for Skirting Boards?

No, you should not use Liquid Nails to attach skirting boards. You should always use screws to attach skirting boards to your wall. Make sure that there is a screw for each stud, every six inches up the wall. This will make it much easier for you to take out or repair anything that needs fixing in the future.

Also, make sure that you are using drywall screws. Longer screws will be better for this job because they will give the fixing skirting boards more support.

Nails should never be used to attach skirting boards as they can pop out over time and cause problems. Glue cannot hold up the weight of the skirting board; it is not strong enough.

Should Skirting Boards Touch the Floor?

The first skirting board should not be touching the floor. They are too low to the ground, and they can cause water damage if you let them touch the floor.

How to Fill the Gap Between Skirting Boards?

You can use filler putty to fill in any unsightly gaps that are left. You will need to push this into place using a putty knife and then scrape it back off before it dries. You should only leave the putty on for about 10 minutes before taking it off again.

How do Make the Mitred Joints Between Skirting Boards Less Noticeable?

You can use a sharp chisel to cut off any jagged ends from your skirting boards accurately. You should then sand the end down until it is smooth and even with each other. Make sure that you also sand down any excess acrylic gap filler before it dries.

MDF Skirting Boards

Skirting boards are typically made of pine, oak, or cedar. MDF is a new type of wood that is becoming popular because of its durability and affordability. It is more expensive than rail (which is the cheapest type of wood) but less expensive than hardwood.

When shopping for MDF skirting boards you should make sure that they come with nail hole guides which will help you straight line up the holes in the right place.

You will want to drill pilot holes into your walls studs before screwing in your skirting board with drywall screws. Make sure that they are at least two inches away from either end so that they are hidden beneath the final skirting board. You should always use screws to attach the skirting board to your wall.

Make sure that you are using drywall screws. Longer screws will be better for this job because they will give the skirting board surface more support. Masonry nails should never be used to attach skirting boards as they can pop out over time and cause problems. Glue cannot hold up the weight of the skirting board; it is not strong enough.

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