Fender Katsalidis and the Contemporary Face of Australian Architecture

Founded on the philosophy of innovation through collaboration, Fender Katsalidis has evolved from a Melbourne-centric architectural practice, to a highly awarded, multi-disciplinary international design firm whose work now influences built environment thinking across the globe. However, some of the architects’ best work lies closer to home. See 7 versatile projects from Fender Katsalidis made for Australia’s cities and scapes:


AUSTRALIA 108


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Southbank

It is a residential tower unlike any other in Australia. Inspired in part by the Commonwealth Star on the national flag, its slender, highly sculptural form is highlighted by a golden starburst expression, which morphs into a curvaceous profile against the sky.

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MONA PAVILIONS


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Hobart

To the north of Hobart, on the banks of Tasmania’s Derwent River, Moorilla Estate vineyards has been synonymous with the arts, music, and architecture since the 1950s—a cultural association broadened and strengthened over the last decade to include a restaurant, micro-brewery and on-site lodging in the form of four pavilions. True to the prevailing unorthodoxy of MONA, these new structures were designed not just in counterpoint to the existing pavilions, but also in contradiction to the concept of privacy that traditionally informs accommodation of this type.

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MONA


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Hobart

Briefed by the client, The Museum of Old and New Art, to be a functional receptacle, not architectural spectacle, MONA is carved into a peninsula outside the city of Hobart, where the bold geometry of its waffle concrete and Corten steel container is weathering gently into the landscape.

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PHOENIX


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Melbourne

Situated amongst wider and bulkier buildings, Phoenix creates a juxtaposition that sets it apart as a unique and singular object against the urban skyline of Melbourne. Its verticality engages in dialogue with its surrounding context whilst distinguishing itself as an elegantly proportioned, sculptural tower—an effect heightened by the integration of a highly recognisable ribbon graphic, designed in collaboration with Garry Emery.

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WALSH HOUSE


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Tasmania

A modernist interpretation of the traditional country house, this private ‘weekender’ mediates between the pristine waters of Tasmania’s Marion Bay to its east, and unspoilt native bushland to its west. Deeply embedded into its coastal setting, the structure is announced landward by a sliver of rocky berm. Amphitheatric in plan, the interface touches the landscape gently, while creating a dramatic arrival experience that continues through an ornamental garden and on to the building’s interior.

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PARQUE


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Melbourne

Befitting its heritage-protected garden setting and elite resident amenity, this multi-residential development makes a significant contribution both to the streetscape of Melbourne’s premier tree-lined boulevard, and its ongoing re-imagining as the city’s premier residential locale.

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ST ANDREWS BEACH HOUSE


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Mornington Peninsula

Situated just 100 metres from the water’s edge, this modernist coastal retreat responds to the specificity of its aggressive environs with a mix of purpose and playfulness. A seemingly simple but profoundly sculptural abstraction of vernacular materials and forms, its asymmetric marriage of cubic volumes stands in powerful and protective defiance to the elements, yet sits with unerring sympathy amidst the fragility of its native beach surrounds.

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Images and Text: Courtesy of Fender Katsalidis

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