Do Plumbers Install Sinks?

Table of Contents

Does a plumber install a kitchen sink, bathroom sink or laundry sink? Let’s start with what a sink is. A kitchen sink is a large, deep sink that’s usually used in the kitchen. It’s often placed in the corner or against a wall because it can be quite heavy when filled with water.

A laundry sink is a smaller version of the kitchen sink, usually found in the basement or utility room. A bathroom sink is also called a lavatory, and it’s on top of a vanity cabinet or countertop that’s placed along one wall of the bathroom.

All three sinks are similar in that they’re all made of stainless steel, porcelain enamel (also called vitreous china) or another type of ceramic material. There are no big differences between them as far as plumbing goes; they can all be plumbed using similar connections and supply lines, including water supper lines.

Each type has its own drain fittings designed specifically for it. For example, bathroom sinks have pop-up stoppers that are actuated by a lever on the side of the sink. Plumbing codes and supply manufacturers agree that all three types of sinks should be plumbed using either a two- or three-hole arrangement.

How to Install Different Types of Kitchen Sinks?

Undermount Sink

Top mount pedestal mounting means that the sink is mounted above the countertop. The water supply hoses from the faucet attach to fittings at a height just below where the countertop ends. Undermount installation means that instead of being set into a cutout space in your countertop, your new sink will be mounted directly to the countertop itself. This is done by attaching base clips to your countertop and securing the sink to them with screws. Top-mount pedestal installation means that all of your new plumbing fixtures will be attached beneath your kitchen, laundry, or bathroom sink and that the faucet hoses will attach to fittings at a height just below where the top of the countertop ends.

Top Mount Sink

Top mount installation means that instead of being set into a cutout space in your countertop, your new sink will be mounted directly to the countertop itself. This is done by attaching base clips to your countertop and securing the sink to them with screws. Top-mount pedestal installation means that all of your new plumbing fixtures will be attached beneath your kitchen, laundry, or bathroom sink and that the faucet hoses will attach to fittings at a height just below where the top of the countertop ends.

Pedestal Mount Sink

A pedestal sink is mounted on a pedestal, which elevates it from the countertop. The most common types of pedestals are stainless steel or made of ceramic materials. Pedestals can be either top or undermount, depending on how your new sink attaches to them. If your new sink mounts to the top of the pedestal, your sink will be top-mounted. If it mounts to the underside of the pedestal, your sink will be undermount.

Drop-in Sink

For a drop-in sink, you’ll have to sacrifice some counter space. A drop-in installation means that your new sink is mounted below the countertop surface. This is done by attaching base clips to your countertop and securing the sink to them with screws. The floor of the cabinet will support the back half of your new drop-in sink while water supply hoses from the faucet attach to fittings at a height just above where the top of your subfloor ends.

Top Centre Mount Sink

Top centre mount sinks can be installed in either top or under mount configurations by using special hinges on both mounts. Installing a top centre mount requires additional drilling in each mounting location but uses only two hinges rather than four as with standard installations. In undermount sinks configurations, the sink is mounted below the countertop surface and the floor of the cabinet supports its weight as with an under-mount sink.

Top Right-hand Mount Sink

A top right-hand mount installation means that all of your new plumbing fixtures will be attached beneath your kitchen, laundry or bathroom sink; however, instead of attaching the faucet hoses to fittings at a height just below where the top of the countertop ends, they attach to fittings at a height just above where the subfloor ends. This means that part of your installation will require you to drill holes through both parts of your countertop (the finished surface and bottom side) while another type of installation would only have required drilling into one part of the countertop.

Typical Single Hole Installation using a Vertical Drain Assembly

A typical single hole installation means that your new sink will be mounted above the countertop and that all of your plumbing fixtures are attached directly to the faucet body which is then connected to an external assembly (vertical drain assembly) mounted at the back of the sink. This type of installation doesn’t require that you drill any holes through your finished surface but does require adjusting both parts of your top for even spacing between mountings.

typical two or three-hole installation In typical two-hole installations, one mounting location is available below the rim on each side while in three-hole installations, there is only one mounting location available beneath the rim on either side. This type of installation means that all of your plumbing fixtures are attached directly to the faucet body which is then connected to an external assembly (vertical drain assembly) mounted at the back of the sink. However, in this case, you’ll have to drill through your finished surface and both parts of your countertop in order to mount it safely between these mounting holes.

Double Hole Installation using a Vertical Drain Assembly

A double hole installation means that one set of faucet holes will be located beneath the rim on either side while another set will be available below that but closer together than the first set. Most often, a three-hole configuration will only include one set of faucet holes beneath each rim with two sets being located closer together beneath the rim on either side. This type of installation means that all of your plumbing fixtures are attached directly to the faucet body which is then connected to an external assembly (vertical drain assembly) mounted at the back of the sink. However, in this case, you’ll have to drill through your finished surface and both parts of your countertop in order to mount it safely between these mounting holes.

A Three-hole Installation using a Vertical Drain Assembly

This configuration means that one set of faucet holes will be located beneath the rim on either side with two sets being available below that but closer together than the first set. Most often a four-hole configuration will only include one set of faucet holes beneath each rim with two sets being located closer together beneath the rim on either side. This type of installation means that all of your plumbing fixtures are attached directly to the faucet body which is then connected to an external assembly (vertical drain assembly) mounted at the back of the sink. However, in this case, you’ll have to drill through your finished surface and both parts of your countertop in order to mount it safely between these mounting holes.

No Perimeter Drilling Installation using a Vertical Drain Assembly In this configuration, all of your new plumbing fixtures will be attached beneath your kitchen, laundry or bathroom sink; however, instead of attaching the faucet hoses to fittings at a height just below where the top of the countertop ends, the valves will be located above the countertop. This means that you’ll have to drill through both parts (the top surface and bottom side) of your countertop in order to attach this assembly but this type of installation doesn’t require adjusting either part for even spacing between mounts.

A typical single hole installation requires that you drill into one part of your finished surface while another type uses an external assembly mounted at the back of the sink. In a double hole configuration, all plumbing fixtures are attached directly to faucet bodies which then connect with an external assembly mounted at the back of the sink. However, in this case, you’ll have to drill through your finished surface and both parts of your counter in order to mount it safely between the mounting holes.

A Four-hole Installation using a Vertical Drain Assembly

Finally, a four-hole configuration means that one set of faucet holes will be located beneath the rim on either side with two sets being available below that but closer together than the first set. The most common type of installation in this group will include just one set of faucet holes beneath each rim with two sets being placed closer together beneath the rim on either side. This type of installation means that all of your plumbing fixtures are attached directly to the faucet body which is then connected to an external assembly (vertical drain assembly) mounted at the back of the sink. However, in order to connect them safely, you’ll need to drill through your finished surface and both parts of your countertop in order to mount

Does a Plumber Install a New Sink?

A plumber installs sinks when they are hired to install new plumbing fixtures in your home. The plumber will make sure all of the pipes are routed properly, connect them to the correct valves, and generally make sure everything is working correctly.

Does a plumber install a kitchen sink, bathroom sink or laundry sink? The answer is no. A plumber does not install any type of sink whether it’s for the kitchen, laundry room or bathroom. That would work for a cabinet installer who installs either a drop-in, top mount, or under-mount sinks in countertops.

The trades involved with installing the three different types of sinks are as follows; kitchen sinks are typically installed by professional cabinet makers and carpenters, laundry/utility room sinks are installed by plumbing professionals such as plumbers or appliance installers and lastly bathroom sinks are typically only installed by professional cabinet makers and carpenters.

All three types of sinks are installed using the same methods with slight variations. Kitchen sinks typically require a two-hole or three-hole installation depending on the faucet and might need to install a gasket around the sink which is done through countertop modification.

Laundry/utility room sinks usually have an integrated cabinet flange so no modifications to existing cabinets are needed, these types of sinks also come in an under-mount variation where they attach directly to the bottom of your existing counters via clips and screws. Lastly, bathroom sinks are mounted in almost the same way as laundry/utility room sinks but must maintain proper water seal which requires caulking between the top lip and countertop when finished.

How to Remove a Kitchen Sink?

We recommend a professional does this, here is a set of steps they may follow:

1. Shut off the water and drain the water from the sink using a plumber’s wrench, or snake.

2. Pry up the clips to loosen the sink from the countertop and remove it by sliding it out from under the cabinets.

3. Place your new sink on your kitchen floor next to the cabinets before removing any fixtures you are replacing. This way, you can’t forget to put them back in when installing.

4. Put on protective gloves and use an air compressor to clear out any debris that might be blocking your plumbing lines, while also making sure it is safe for you to see what is going on inside of them with your eyesight. Unscrew the water lines and remove them from their respective spots.

5. Loosen any bolts you find connecting your old sink to the countertop; they will be located at each of their corresponding places.

6. Remove your old sink, either by lifting it out or sliding it off and place it in a safe location away from anything that might damage it.

7. Place your new sink in its designated area and secure it with the clips that previously held your old one, or use bolts to fasten them into place.

8. Connect the water lines to their corresponding spots, ensuring you have also attached them to the T-shaped drain if so equipped, and turn on your water.

9. Check for leaks and inspect your work.

How to Replace a Bathroom Sink?

Again as above, we recommend a professional does this, here is a set of steps they may follow:

1. Shut off the water and drain the water from the sink using a plumber’s wrench, or snake. Remove caulk if needed around sink base cabinet flange where new sink will rest under existing countertop so it will sit flush against the countertop.

2. Loosen any nuts or bolts holding the sink to the countertop.

3. Disconnect the drain connections and pop up assembly, then remove the old sink by sliding out from under the cabinet. Also disconnect the faucet, if present, and set it aside for re-use on new sink installation.

4. Place the new sink in position and secure it to the countertop with new bolts or hardware.

5. Re-attach drain connections (if present) for pop up assembly, and attach faucet. Ensure all connections are tight then re-caulk around flange/sink perimeter if necessary.

6. Turn on the water supply and check for leaks.

7. Successfully installed new sink!

Disclaimer: Under no circumstances should you attempt to install your own kitchen or bathroom sinks without the supervision of a professional plumber, as personal injury may result from improper handling and/or installation of equipment and fixtures used in your home.

How Long does a Sink Installation Take?

Usually an hour or two to install a sink unless there are plumbing issues that might require extensive work. It may also take longer if there is not a template for the countertop. A sink can be installed in one or two hours, depending on your drain lines and how the counter is put together. It may also depend on the type of sink you have too.

How Much does it Cost to Install a Bathroom Sink?

A bathroom sink installation can cost quite a bit as plumbers in Australia charge between $100 to $150 an hour for this service.

How Much does It Cost to Install a Kitchen Sink?

The cost of installing a kitchen sink varies widely, depending on the plumber. In Australia, plumbers charge between $100 and $150 per hour.

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